MAXIMILIAN’S GREATEST VICTORY FROM A LOCAL PERSPECTIVE

Text by Elisabeth Klecker, Christof Metzger, Friedrich Simader

German version below

Download the fulltext here

After the dispute over the inheritance of Duke George the Rich of Bavaria-Landshut († 1 December 1503) between Ruprecht of the Palatinate and Duke Albrecht of Bavaria-Munich, who was supported by his brother-in-law Maximilian, escalated into the so-called Landshut War of Succession, both sides initially relied on a strategy of attrition in their warfare. On 12 September 1504, the only major battle of the war finally brought a preliminary decision at Wenzenbach near Regensburg: The victory of Maximilian’s and Duke Albrecht’s troops over the Bohemian mercenaries recruited by Count Palatine Ruprecht gave Maximilian the opportunity to end the conflict in the Cologne Verdict (30 July 1505) and thus also assert his authority over the imperial princes: he was at the height of his power. It is therefore not surprising that the “Battle of Bohemia” occupies a special place in Maximilian’s memorial work. Maximilian’s victory found an immediate echo in contemporary German event poetry, humanists such as Heinrich Bebel, Conrad Celtis and Hieronymus Vehus seized the opportunity to write Latin panegyric, and the war also provided the traditional subject of an epic: in the Austrias de bello Norico, Ricardo Bartolini († 1529) places Maximilian above ancient heroes.

Johann Kurtz – Hans Burgkmair the Elder: The Behemoth Battle

A single-sheet print stands out from the immediate contemporary publicity, which combines a rhyming couplet in 132 verses attributed to Johann Kurtz with a woodcut illustration Die behemsch schlacht by Hans Burgkmair the Elder. The Albertina Vienna owns a copy (DG 1959/279) that has been cut into text and image sections, with Latin notes on the verso: On the verso of the text part the historical classification from Nicolaus Baselius’ continuation of the Chronicle of Johannes Nauclerus (Nicolaus Beselius in additione Chronographiae Joannis Naucleri tubingensis, Tübingen 1516), fol. CCCVIIr-r.

Nicolaus Beselius in additione Chronographiae Joannis Naucleri tubingensis, Tübingen 1516, fol. 156r.

Nam referunt mille sexcentos viros ex Boemia in ore gladii cecidisse, captis plurimis, atque in fugam reliquis elapsis. Anno domini MCCCCCIII cum in Bavaria res ferro et igne agerentur, Rupertus Bavariae dux et Georgii ducis defuncti gener, videns quam nihil proficeret, quinpotius hostium gustata tyrannide omnia in praecipitium irent, dolore cordis tandem intrinseco annum aetatis agens XXIII. mortem obiit, uxor vidua non diu supervivens mortis acerbitate absumpta virum secuta est.

Translation

“It is reported that 1600 men from Bohemia fell victim to the sword, many were captured and the rest escaped by flight. In 1503, when Bavaria was fought with fire and sword, Duke Ruprecht of the Palatinate, the son-in-law of the late Duke Georg, had to see how little he was able to achieve, indeed that everything was more likely to be affected by the regime of the enemy and plunged into the abyss; he finally died at the age of 23 from the pain that had struck him deep in his heart; his widowed wife did not survive him for long, but followed her husband, carried away by a bitter death.”

The entry on the verso of the woodcut, which consists of two sets of five Latin hexameters separated by a red line, appears more interesting:

Nicolaus Beselius in additione Chronographiae Joannis Naucleri tubingensis, Tübingen 1516, fol. 157r.

Princeps romanus regum rex Maximilianus

Magnanimus fortis victor clarissimus armis

Magnificus felix regum justissimus unus

Boiemos vicit felici et Marte cecidit

Egressos patriis silvis et iure triumphat.

Postquam omnes tenuere fugam parsumque tricentis

Cedibus et multo maduere sanguine campi

Cesar iam fessas revocans in castra cohortes

Captorum turbam ingentem manibusque revinctum

Vulgus Regini victor praemisit ad arcem.

Translation

“The Roman Princeps, King of Kings Maximilian,

A valiant, strong victor, highly famed in arms,

The greatest, the happiest, the most righteous of kings,

Defeated the Bohemians and put them down in happy conflict,

when they had left their native forests,

and rightly he triumphs

After everyone had fled and the three hundred murders had been stopped

murder was halted and the fields were dripping with blood,

Caesar called the already weary troops back to camp

And sent an immense number of prisoners, bound at the hands

as victors to the castle of Regensburg.”

In contrast to the verso of the text section, there is no indication of the source, but these are also quotations – from two different works: The first five verses are from an occasional poem by Heinrich Bebel (1472-1518), which was probably written soon after the Battle of Wenzenbach, but was not printed until 1509: Ecloga triumphalis (Heinreich Bebel, (1472-1518), Opera Bebeliana sequentia: Triumphus Veneris […], Pforzheim, Anshelm, 1509). The second group of verses is the beginning of the eleventh book of the Austrias (De bello Norico Austriados libri duodecim), which begins immediately after the battle described in the tenth book. The first edition of 1516 was used; the edition annotated by Jakob Spiegel (1483-1547) (together with the Ligurinus 1531 Gvntheri Poëtæ clarissimi, Ligvrinvs, seu Opus De Rebus gestis Imp. Cæsaris Friderici I. Avg. Lib. X. absolutum. Richardi Bartholini, Perusini, Avstriados Lib. XII. Maximiliano Augusto dicati. Cvm Scholiis Iacobi Spiegellij Selest. V. C.), offers the text with a correction in the first verse (cruentis [“bloody”] instead of the inappropriate trecentis [“three hundredfold]), which Spiegel had of course already published in 1516 under the Emendationes dedicated to Erasmus Strenberger following the first edition.

While a look at the Austrias is the obvious place to find suitable verses on the Landshut War of Succession and its decisive battle, the preceding quotation presupposes a more detailed knowledge of the panegyric on the Battle of Regensburg: the verse group is taken from the middle of Bebel’s eclogue, but its content is self-contained and comprehensible in itself. This is due to the peculiarity that the shepherds’ song of praise to the victor Maximilian is structured like a verse in the form of a refrain (versus intercalaris), modelled on Virgil’s eighth eclogue.

The leaves in the Albertina originate from the holdings of the Vienna Court Library; they were removed from the manuscript Cod. 3301 in 1873 as an illustrated broadsheet (fols. 156 and 157) and incorporated into the copperplate engraving collection, which came to the Albertina in the course of the museum reform in 1920/21. Cod. 3301 is an anthology compiled by Hieronymus Streit(e)l († after 1531), prior of the Augustinian hermit monastery of St Salvator in Regensburg between 1515 and 1518. Streitel was probably the librarian of his monastery between 1502 and 1527 and used this activity for historical research, whereby his interest was primarily, although not exclusively, in the local history of Regensburg: several volumes from his estate have been preserved in libraries in Hamburg, Munich and Vienna, in which Streitel compiled relevant material in manuscript form, but also included printed material. The composite manuscripts also show Streitel as a reader of humanist poetry – Sebastian Brant is represented as well as Conrad Celtis and Baptista Mantuanus, whereby a focus on humanist praise of saints can be recognised. The original composition of the Viennese manuscript also suggests a certain penchant for illustrated broadsheets on a wide variety of topics.

A reader from Regensburg

The two-part leaf of the Albertina and the autograph entries on the verso thus concentrate several of Streitel’s interests, but the local Regensburg reference was undoubtedly of primary importance. In the collectanea in Codex Clm 14053 (Hieronymus Streitl, Kollektaneen des Hieronymus Streitel, BSB Clm 14053, fig. 1 on 431) of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek there is a further entry on the battle (fol. 200r): Epitaphium in strage Boemorum per Caesarem facta apud Ratisponam. Streitel read humanist poems on the occasion of Maximilian’s victory, probably not only in praise of the heroic victor, but also because they could serve as testimony to the historical significance of Regensburg.

Streitel’s anthology, like other books in his possession and from his monastery, most likely came to Vienna through the collecting activities of the imperial court counsellor Caspar Nidbruck (1525-1557), to whom we owe the foundation of the court library, and thus today’s Austrian National Library. Nidbruck visited the Augustinian hermit monastery of St Salvator in Regensburg at least twice; according to the surviving notes, he acquired over 50 manuscripts and prints.

Deutsche Fassung

Nachdem der Streit um das Erbe Herzog Georgs des Reichen von Bayern-Landshut († 1. Dezember 1503) zwischen Ruprecht von der Pfalz und dem von seinem Schwager Maximilian unterstützten Herzog Albrecht von Bayern-München im sog. Landshuter Erbfolgekrieg eskaliert war, setzten beide Seiten in der Kriegsführung zunächst auf eine Abnützungsstrategie. Am 12. September 1504 brachte schließlich die einzige größere Schlacht des Krieges bei Wenzenbach nahe Regensburg eine Vorentscheidung: Der Sieg der Truppen Maximilians und Herzog Albrechts über die von Pfalzgraf Ruprecht angeworbenen böhmischen Söldner gab Maximilian die Möglichkeit, den Konflikt im Kölner Spruch (30. Juli 1505) zu beenden und damit auch seine Autorität gegenüber den Reichsfürsten zu behaupten: Er stand am Höhepunkt seiner Macht. Es ist daher nicht überraschend, dass die „Böhmenschlacht“ eine besondere Stelle in Maximilians Gedächtniswerk einnimmt. Maximilians Sieg fand unmittelbares Echo in der zeitgenössischen deutschen Ereignisdichtung, Humanisten wie Heinrich Bebel, Conrad Celtis und Hieronymus Vehus ergriffen die Gelegenheit zu lateinischer Panegyrik, der Krieg lieferte auch das traditionelle Sujet eines Epos: In der Austrias de bello Norico stellt Ricardo Bartolini († 1529) Maximilian über antike Helden.

Johann Kurtz – Hans Burgkmair d. Ä., Die behemsch schlacht

Aus der unmittelbaren zeitgenössischen Publizistik sticht ein Einblattdruck hervor, der einen Johann Kurtz zugeschriebenen Reimpaarspruch in 132 Versen mit einer Holzschnittillustration Die behemsch schlacht von Hans Burgkmair d. Ä. kombiniert. Die Albertina Wien besitzt ein in Text- und Bildteil zerschnittenes Exemplar (DG 1959/279), auf dessen Rückseiten sich lateinische Notizen befinden: Auf dem Verso des Textteils die historische Einordnung aus der Fortsetzung des Nicolaus Baselius zur Chronik des Johannes Nauclerus (Nicolaus Beselius in additione Chronographiae Joannis Naucleri tubingensis, Tübingen 1516), fol. CCCVIIr-v.

Nicolaus Beselius in additione Chronographiae Joannis Naucleri tubingensis, Tübingen 1516, fol. 156r.

Nam referunt mille sexcentos viros ex Boemia in ore gladii cecidisse, captis plurimis, atque in fugam reliquis elapsis. Anno domini MCCCCCIII cum in Bavaria res ferro et igne agerentur, Rupertus Bavariae dux et Georgii ducis defuncti gener, videns quam nihil proficeret, quinpotius hostium gustata tyrannide omnia in praecipitium irent, dolore cordis tandem intrinseco annum aetatis agens XXIII. mortem obiit, uxor vidua non diu supervivens mortis acerbitate absumpta virum secuta est.

Übersetzung

„Man berichtet nämlich, dass 1600 Männer aus Böhmen dem Schwert zum Opfer fielen, sehr viele gefangen genommen wurden und die übrigen durch Flucht entkamen. Als im Jahr 1503 in Bayern mit Feuer und Schwert gekämpft wurde, musste Herzog Ruprecht von der Pfalz, der Schwiegersohn des verstorbenen Herzogs Georg, mitansehen, wie wenig er ausrichtete, ja dass eher alles das Regime der Feinde zu spüren bekam und in den Abgrund stürzte; er verstarb schließlich am Schmerz, der ihn tief im Herzen getroffen hatte, im 23. Lebensjahr; die verwitwete Gattin überlebte ihn nicht lange, sondern folgte von einem bitteren Tod dahingerafft ihrem Mann.“

Interessanter erscheint der Eintrag auf dem Verso des Holzschnitts, der aus zweimal fünf durch eine rote Linie von einander abgesetzten lateinischen Hexametern besteht:

Nicolaus Beselius in additione Chronographiae Joannis Naucleri tubingensis, Tübingen 1516, fol. 157r.

Princeps romanus regum rex Maximilianus

Magnanimus fortis victor clarissimus armis

Magnificus felix regum justissimus unus

Boiemos vicit felici et Marte cecidit

Egressos patriis silvis et iure triumphat.

Postquam omnes tenuere fugam parsumque tricentis

Cedibus et multo maduere sanguine campi

Cesar iam fessas revocans in castra cohortes

Captorum turbam ingentem manibusque revinctum

Vulgus Regini victor praemisit ad arcem.

Translation

„Der römische Princeps, König der Könige Maximilian,

Ein hochherziger, starker Sieger, hochberühmt in Waffen,

Der großartige, glückliche, der Könige allergerechtester,

Besiegte die Böhmen und machte sie in glücklichem Streit nieder,

als sie die heimatlichen Wälder verlassen hatten,

und zurecht triumphiert er

Nachdem alle die Flucht ergriffen hatten und dem dreihundertfachen

Morden Einhalt geboten war und die Felder vom vielen Blut trieften,

Da rief Caesar die schon ermüdeten Truppen ins Lager zurück

Und sandte eine ungeheure Menge Gefangener, an den Händen gefesseltes

Volk als Sieger voraus zur Burg von Regensburg.“

Im Unterschied zum Verso des Textteils fehlt eine Quellenangabe, es handelt sich jedoch auch hier um Zitate – aus zwei verschiedenen Werken: Die ersten fünf Verse stammen aus einem Gelegenheitsgedicht Heinrich Bebels (1472–1518), das bald nach der Schlacht bei Wenzenbach entstanden sein dürfte, jedoch erst 1509 gedruckt wurde: Ecloga triumphalis (Heinreich Bebel, (1472-1518), Opera Bebeliana sequentia: Triumphus Veneris […], Pforzheim, Anshelm, 1509). Bei der zweiten Versgruppe handelt es sich um den Anfang des elften Buchs der Austrias (De bello Norico Austriados libri duodecim), das unmittelbar nach der im zehnten Buch geschilderten Schlacht einsetzt. Benützt wurde der Erstdruck von 1516, die von Jakob Spiegel (1483–1547) kommentierte Ausgabe (gemeinsam mit dem Ligurinus 1531 Gvntheri Poëtæ clarissimi, Ligvrinvs, seu Opus De Rebus gestis Imp. Cæsaris Friderici I. Avg. Lib. X. absolutum. Richardi Bartholini, Perusini, Avstriados Lib. XII. Maximiliano Augusto dicati. Cvm Scholiis Iacobi Spiegellij Selest. V. C.) bietet den Text mit einer Korrektur im ersten Vers (cruentis „blutig“ statt des nicht sinnvollen trecentis „dreihundertfach“), die Spiegel freilich schon 1516 unter den Erasmus Strenberger gewidmeten Emendationes im Anschluss an den Erstdruck publiziert hatte.

Während ein Blick in die Austrias naheliegt, um passende Verse zum Landshuter Erbfolgekrieg und seiner Entscheidungsschlacht zu finden, setzt das vorangehende Zitat eine genauere Kenntnis der Panegyrik zur Schlacht bei Regensburg voraus: Die Versgruppe ist mitten aus Bebels Ekloge herausgegriffen, jedoch inhaltlich geschlossen und für sich verständlich. Dies verdankt sich der Eigenart, dass das Loblied der Hirten auf den Sieger Maximilian nach dem Vorbild von Vergils achter Ekloge durch einen Refrain (versus intercalaris) strophenartig gegliedert ist.

Die Blätter der Albertina stammen aus dem Bestand der Wiener Hofbibliothek, sie wurden 1873 als illustrierter Einblattdruck aus der Handschrift Cod. 3301 herausgelöst (ff. 156 und 157) und der Kupferstichsammlung einverleibt; diese kam im Zuge der Museumsreform 1920/21 an die Albertina. Cod. 3301 ist ein Sammelband, der von Hieronymus Streit(e)l († nach 1531), zwischen 1515 und 1518 Prior des Augustiner-Eremiten-Kloster St. Salvator in Regensburg, zusammengestellt wurde. Streitel war vermutlich zwischen 1502 und 1527 Bibliothekar seines Klosters und nützte die Tätigkeit für historische Forschungen, wobei sein Interesse in erster Linie, wenn auch nicht ausschließlich, der Regensburger Lokalgeschichte galt: In Bibliotheken in Hamburg, München und Wien haben sich aus seinem Nachlass mehrere Bände erhalten, in denen Streitel entsprechende Materialien handschriftlich zusammengestellt, aber auch Drucke eingebunden hat. Die Sammelhandschriften zeigen Streitel zugleich als Leser humanistischer Dichtung – Sebastian Brant ist ebenso vertreten wie Conrad Celtis und Baptista Mantuanus, wobei ein Schwerpunkt bei humanistischem Heiligenlob zu erkennen ist. Die ursprüngliche Zusammensetzung der Wiener Handschrift lässt zudem auf ein gewisses Faible für illustrierte Einblattdrucke schließen, die zu unterschiedlichsten Themen versammelt waren.

Ein Regensburger Leser

In dem zweigeteilten Blatt der Albertina und den autographen Einträgen der Rückseiten konzentrieren sich also mehrere Interessen Streitels, vorrangig war aber zweifellos der Regensburger Lokalbezug. In den Collectaneen im Codex Clm 14053 (Hieronymus Streitl, Kollektaneen des Hieronymus Streitel, BSB Clm 14053, fig. 1 on 431) der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek findet sich ein weiterer Eintrag zur Schlacht (fol. 200r): Epitaphium in strage Boemorum per Caesarem facta apud Ratisponam. Streitel las humanistische Dichtungen aus Anlass von Maximilians Sieg wohl nicht nur als Lob für den heroischen Sieger, sondern weil sie als Zeugnisse für die historische Bedeutung Regensburgs dienen konnten.

Nach Wien kam Streitels Sammelband wie andere Bücher aus seinem Besitz und aus seinem Kloster mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit durch die Sammeltätigkeit des kaiserlichen Hofrats Caspar Nidbruck (1525–1557), der wir den Grundstock der Hofbibliothek, und damit der heutigen Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek verdanken. Nidbruck besuchte das Augustiner-Eremiten-Kloster St. Salvator in Regensburg mindestens zweimal; laut den erhaltenen Notizen erwarb er dabei über 50 Handschriften und Drucke.

 



Cite this blog post
Jonathan Dumont (2024, March 25). MAXIMILIAN’S GREATEST VICTORY FROM A LOCAL PERSPECTIVE. Managing Maximilian (1493-1519). Retrieved April 24, 2024, from https://manmax.hypotheses.org/1917

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search